Some Genocides Are More Politically Correct Than Others

The Confederate flag and most other white Southern symbols have been stripped down from almost all public monuments in the South and whatever other parts of the country might once have sported them, but white-haters still can't let it go.

The most recent installment of white-hatred comes from Vanderbilt University, where a black professor is braying advocacy of something close to the outright genocide of white Southerners.

Jonathan David Farley is an assistant professor of mathematics at Vanderbilt and apparently spends more time calculating how many whites should decorate the local lamp posts than at what the school supposedly pays him to do. The latest spillage of the waste products that pass for his political ideas appeared in the Nashville Tennessean. [Jonathan Farley, "Remnants of the Confederacy glorifying a time of tyranny," November 20, 2002]

Mr. Farley wrote that "every Confederate soldier ... deserved not a hallowed resting place at the end of his days but a reservation at the end of the gallows."

Interpreted literally, and you can bet your Confederate nickels that's how Mr. Farley wants it interpreted, that means Mr. Farley would have liked to murder several hundred thousand to a million white Southerners and thereby virtually exterminate whites in the South.

It's not unlikely he entertains the same agenda for whites today.

The United Daughters of the Confederacy, he wrote, is an organization "that honors traitors," while Confederate Gen. Bedford Forrest was a "19th century Hitler" and modern-day Confederate heritage groups are "the new holocaust revisionists." "The race problems that wrack the United States to this day are due largely to the fact that the Confederacy was not thoroughly destroyed, its leaders and soldiers executed, and their lands given to the landless freed slaves," he trumpets.

Allen Sullivant, head of heritage defense for the Sons of Confederate Veterans, one of the heritage groups Mr. Farley thinks is indistinguishable from "holocaust revisionists," says the professor is "just one of those people who's got a real chip on his shoulder."

You perhaps already guessed that.

The professor's eruption in the Tennessean was hardly his first, however. In 1997 he ran for Congress (as a Green; surprisingly, he didn't denounce the party's name as racist) and quickly labeled his two rivals in the Democratic and Republican Parties as "two old white men with identical views." Actually that's probably not an inaccurate description, but Mr. Farley probably also thinks they should be executed along with the Confederate veterans.

A clue to where Professor Farley is coming from is that his real hero is Che Guevara, and his photograph on the university's web page shows a grim-faced Mr. Farley with arms folded across his chest trying his best to look like a black Benito Mussolini in front of a picture of Che. You have to wonder if anyone has ever tried to tell the professor that his politics are about 40 years out of date; probably not, they'd end up on the gallows.

Mr. Farley [send him mail], and the university have been receiving quite a bit of e-mail recently from white Southerners outraged at what he said. No doubt they should be, but the more appropriate reaction to preposterous creatures like him is a good, long snicker.

The university's vice chancellor, Michael Schoenfeld, [send him mail] is careful to explain to anyone interested in listening that "Professor Farley ... does not represent Vanderbilt University's policy, and his statements are neither supported nor endorsed by the university."

No doubt we are all refreshed by learning that, but the school has to expect that if it hires great minds like Mr. Farley, it will receive more than its own fair share of snickers (or worse) as well.

What is a bit more frightening than the desperate and rather pathetic efforts of an unnoticeable mediocrity to attract attention to himself is the willingness of both the university and the Tennessean to give him a platform at all.

If Vanderbilt had a white teacher who posed before a picture of Hitler (or for that matter Bedford Forrest) and said the real reason the United States is "wracked" by race problems is that whites didn't execute all the slaves instead of freeing them and making them citizens, would the university proclaim its neutrality with quite as much nonchalance as it does with Mr. Farley? Would the professor espousing such views get to spout them out in the Tennessean?

As such a hypothetical white man, paraphrasing Professor Farley, might write,

"The race problems that wrack the United States to this day are due largely to the fact that universities, newspapers, and similar institutions that permit and even encourage the expression of anti-white race hatred have not been thoroughly destroyed, their leaders executed, and their assets given to over-taxed whites."

Of course, I neither support nor endorse such ideas myself.

But they are worth publishing—don't you think?

[A selection of Sam Francis' columns, America Extinguished: Mass Immigration And The Disintegration Of American Culture, is now available from Americans For Immigration Control.]

COPYRIGHT CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC.

December 09, 2002