WSJ: “Most-Racial America: Antiwhite bigotry goes mainstream”

Something I haven`t been able to bring myself to do is make a list of the vast outpouring of animus toward white men since the election. Of course, this orgy of insults has nothing to do with the unfair strength of white men, and everything to do with their weakness and fairness.
James Taranto, WSJ editorial page editor, inspects a representative example of this rhetoric in the Wall Street Journal:

Most-Racial America 

Antiwhite bigotry goes mainstream.

By JAMES TARANTO 

At issue is a Nov. 19 letter to the President Obama, written by Rep. Jeff Duncan of South Carolina and signed by 97 House Republicans, which declares that the signatories are “deeply troubled” that the president is considering nominating Rice secretary of state, and that they “strongly oppose” such a nomination.

“Ambassador Rice is widely viewed as having either willfully or incompetently misled the American public in the Benghazi matter,” the letter states. We noted Tuesday with some amusement that Rep. Jim Clyburn, a South Carolina Democrat and member of the Congressional Black Caucus, was claiming that “incompetent” was the latest code word for “black.”

Let`s examine this argument carefully. The Post acknowledges that “we can`t know their hearts.” But it finds a (literally) prima facie reason to suspect them of invidious motives: Almost all of them are persons of pallor. The Post is casting aspersions on Duncan and his colleagues based explicitly on the color of their skin. And it is accusing them of racism! 

A couple of other items related to race and politics caught our attention over the Thanksgiving weekend. First, Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., an Illinois Democrat and CBC member, resigned from Congress “amid federal ethics investigations and a diagnosis of mental illness,” as the Chicago Tribune reports. That sets up a special election to fill the vacancy:

Some Democrats quickly offered to broker a nominee to avoid several African-American contenders splitting the vote in the heavily Democratic and majority black 2nd Congressional District, which could allow a white candidate to win.

This passes with neither editorial comment nor a disapproving quote. It`s hard to imagine the same absence of reaction if a group of pols offered “to broker a nominee” with the goal of preventing a black candidate from winning a white-majority district. 

Then there`s the email from the Obama campaign–yeah, they`re still coming, though at a slower pace than before the election–inviting supporters to take a survey. Among the questions: “Which constituency groups do you identify yourself with? Select all that apply.”

There are 22 boxes you can check off. Some are ideological (“Environmentalists” and perhaps “Labor”), some occupational (“Educators,” “Healthcare professionals”), some regional (“Americans abroad,” “Rural Americans”). There`s a box for “Women” but none for men, though there`s a separate “Gender” question, which hilariously has three options: “Male,” “Female” and “Other/no answer.”Touréwill no doubt soon inveigh against the “otherization” of the Gender No. 3. 

What caught our attention were the ethnic categories: “African Americans,” “Arab-Americans,” “Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders,” Jewish Americans,” “Latinos” and “Native Americans” (the last, of course, refers to American Indians, not natural-born citizens). 

Notice anything missing? 

One explanation for the absence of a “white” or “European-American” category (or, alternatively, several dozen specific European ethnicities) could be that whites tend to vote Republican, and the campaign is interested in Democratic-leaning voting blocs. But several other of the Obama survey categories lean toward the GOP, too: “People of faith,” “Rural Americans,” “Seniors,” “Small business owners” and “Veterans/military families.” Counterpart groups that are Democratic-leaning or swing-voting are missing from the list, too, including nonbelievers, urban and suburban dwellers, and the middle-aged (though there are categories for both “Young professionals” and “Youth”). 

The reason for the absence of a “Whites” category is that white identity politics is all but nonexistent in America today. That wasn`t always the case, of course: For a century after the Civil War, Southern white supremacists were an important part of the Democratic Party coalition. They were defeated and discredited in the 1960s, and the Democrats, still the party of identity politics, switched their focus to various nonwhite minorities. 

Obama`s re-election was a triumph for this new identity politics–but the Post`s nasty editorial hints at a reason to think this form of politics may have long-term costs for both the party and the country. 

The trouble with a diverse coalition based on ethnic or racial identity is that solidarity within each group can easily produce conflicts among the groups. Permissive immigration policies, for example, may be good for Hispanics and Asians but bad for blacks. Racial preferences in college admissions help blacks and Hispanics at the expense of Asians. 

One way of holding together such a disparate coalition is by delivering prosperity, so that everyone can feel he`s doing well. Failing that, another way is by identifying a common adversary–such as the “white male.” During Obama`s first term, the demonization of the “white male” was common among left-liberal commentators, especially MSNBC types. The Post has now lent its considerably more mainstream institutional voice to this form of bigotry. 

This seems likely to weaken the taboo against white identity politics. Whites who are not old enough to remember the pre-civil-rights era–Rep. Duncan, for instance, was born in 1966–have every reason to feel aggrieved by being targeted in this way. 

The danger to Democrats is that they still need white votes. According to this year`s exit polls, Obama won re-election while receiving only 39% of the white vote. But that`s higher than Mitt Romney`s percentage among blacks (6%), Latinos (27%), Asian-Americans (26%) or “Other” (38%). It`s true that Republicans suffer electorally for the perception that they are hostile to minorities, but Democrats also stand to suffer for being hostile to whites. 

The danger for the country is that a racially polarized electorate will produce a hostile, balkanized culture. In 2008 Obama held out the hope of a postracial America. His re-election raises the possibility of a most-racial America.

Well said. But, notice, that as a white guy writing for white guys, Taranto can`t help but say that the problem with the current orgy of demonization of white guys is that it`s bad for everybody, not that it`s bad for white guys.

Presumably, Taranto of the WSJ has been reading me for a long time. But he`s kind of new to writing about this. So, he may figure that his nicely balance appeal to fairness and the public weal might persuade Democrats to moderate their course by frightening them that they are inciting a white backlash. But, I suspect they will have a succinct yet far-reaching reply:

“Shut up, you loser.”

Why compromise when you can have it all? Control of the political process and control of the discourse?

What do you think Jorge Ramos, Univision`s anchorman, will say to himself when reading this? “Hey, Taranto, your job is to promote `There shall be open borders` and get my taxes cut. If I was worried about the natives I wouldn`t insult them so much. So, get back to work and no more mouthing off, or I`ll call you a racist for asking for equality and fairness.”