A Reader Wants A Real Fence, Not A Sonic Barrier

Allan Wall's Blog Item Glenn Spencer and the Sonic Barrier

From: Jesse Mossman [Email him]

Glenn Spencer's  website, americanpatrol.com, has long been on my list of sites to read every day—along with VDARE.com, of course. So I am familiar with Spencer's Sonic Barrier. If it indeed performs as reported, it sounds very good and should be deployed at once.

However, the Sonic Barrier is no substitute for what we desperately need: an unclimbable double wall or fence topped by razor wire and incorporating a vehicle barrier. As Mr. Wall points out at the end of his piece on the Sonic Barrier, "its value depends on having a government with the will to utilize it." I can see a government like the present one ordering agents to ignore the intruder signals and let the invaders proceed.

Whereas the Sonic Barrier requires an active border patrol to work, a good wall should provide some passive protection. Although any barrier can be breeched with enough effort, a really formidable physical barrier should present physical and psychological deterrents which should reduce the number of incursions even when an administration like Obama's ignores its responsibilities—as well as the Constitution.

However, there is another benefit to having the entire border fenced with an effective barrier, one which is seldom mentioned—the effect on the people of the United States. The real battle which patriotic immigration reformers face is not with immigrants, legal or illegal, but with their fellow citizens. We are faced with a weakening of the concept of the United States as a distinct, separate nation.

Today we have a menagerie of characters for whom patriotism and our western heritage of freedom is passé—a mere historical artifact surviving among what they see as the mouth breathing, unenlightened rubes of flyover country. There are liberals who believe "no person is illegal", the Slave Power which will sell out our country and its citizens for cheap labor, and idealistic neocons who push for globalization starting with a North American Union and ending with world government.

However, as Ian Fletcher points out in Free Trade Doesn't Work: What Should Replace It and Why, , globalization isn't inevitable, it is a choice. The European Union is failing and the dangers of multiculturalism are, if anything, even more apparent in Europe then here. An effective physical wall tells everyone that we can just say, "NO!"—that we are, and will continue to be, an English-speaking nation which adheres to the traditional values which made this country prosperous and strong. Third World nations are what they are—not from lack of resources or other excuses—but because of the values of the people who live in them. We do not have to let them remake our country in their image.

See a previous letter from Jesse Mossman.

James Fulford writes: In a blog post titled The Virtual Fence And The Air Assault, I wrote 

"Virtual Fence" is another name for Burglar Alarm. The idea is that the camera shows the intruder, where they're coming in, where they're heading, and if they're carrying rifles.

But once the alarm is given, the government has to do something, and that's what has made us all skeptics. The Bush Administration, after years of scandalously bad border security, sent unarmed national guardsmen to the border, and agents Ramos and Compean to prison.

It's easy to visualize the appropriate force to respond to incursions detected by the sensors. A US Army helicopter force carrying a mix of infantry and MPs, the infantry to make sure the illegals surrender, and MPs to accept the surrender, search the prisoners, and prepare them for their return to Mexico.

The infantrymen would have rifles (loaded) with bayonets (sharpened). The MPs would carry nightsticks (large) and pistols (loaded). See FM 3-19.4, Military Police Leaders Handbook for details.

It's easy to visualize such a force, since America fought much of the Vietnam War on this basis, and it's possible that such forces are guarding borders in Iraq at this moment.

It's not easy to visualize Commander In Chief Barack Obama sending such a force to the border to protect the United States from invasion. After all, George Bush didn't, and he wasn't considered shy about the use of military force.

And that's why we need the real fence. It works, even when there's no one to answer the alarm.