“Why Does VDARE.COM Run All These Weird Ads?”

“Why Does VDARE.COM Run All These Weird Ads?” This is a polite version of the question readers have been emailing me since we began running advertisements in our right column.

The answer: Google Ads is a completely automatic thing that just posts ads to websites participating in its program according to some mysterious algorithm involving readership, keywords and clickthroughs that Google has developed.

I didn`t want to have ads at all. But when we were forced into it by sheer financial need, I just took the position that we should maximize revenue—I figured it was the immigration lawyers` etc. problem if Google had them advertising to a hostile audience. It seemed to me we had to exploit any contradiction we could find in a massively hostile climate.

But maybe I spent too much time arguing with student Marxists in the 1960s. (Also, I never look at ads.)

The continual complaints have got me worrying that readers might well think we`re involved in the selection, which I can see might strike them as a problem. We can block ads (and have blocked some as a result of particularly bitter complaints), but at some point it will impact our revenue, which is a trickle but still very welcome.

So if you are particularly annoyed by an ad, let us know.

But if you can tough it out, it earns us money that we put towards the cause.

Peter Brimelow (email him) is editor of VDARE.COM and author of the much-denounced Alien Nation: Common Sense About America`s Immigration Disaster, (Random House – 1995) and The Worm in the Apple (HarperCollins – 2003)

“Why Does VDARE.COM Run All These Weird Ads?”

“Why Does VDARE.COM Run All These Weird Ads?” This is a polite version of the question readers have been emailing me since we began running advertisements in our left column.

The answer: Google Ads is a completely automatic thing that just posts ads to websites participating in its program according to some mysterious algorithm involving readership, keywords and clickthroughs that Google has developed.

I didn’t want to have ads at all, but when we were forced into it by sheer financial need, I just took the position that we should maximize revenue—I figured it was the immigration lawyers’ etc. problem if Google had them advertising to a hostile audience. It seemed to me we had to exploit any contradiction we could find in a massively hostile climate.

But maybe I spent too much time arguing with student Marxists in the 1960s. (Also, I never look at ads.)

The continual complaints have got me worrying that readers might well think we’re involved in the selection, which I can see might strike them as a problem. We can block ads (and have blocked some as a result of particularly bitter complaints), but at some point it will impact our revenue, which is a trickle but still very welcome.

So if you are particularly annoyed by an ad, let us know. But if you can tough it out, it earns us money that we put towards the cause.