National Data | Chart | More Jobs—But Only New Immigrant Groups Need Apply

Table1:

March Employment Numbers: A Blowout For

Hispanics; Mediocre For Other Groups

  February March        
  2004 2004 Increase % Increase    
  (Employment in 1,000s)      
Total 137,384 137,691 307 0.2%    
White 113,834 113,921 87 0.1%    
Black 14,650 14,793 143 1.0%    
Asian 5,900 5,971 71 1.2%    
Hispanic 17,170 17,534 364 2.1%    
  (Unemployment Rate)      
Total 5.6% 5.7% 0.1%      
White 4.9% 5.1% 0.2%      
Black 9.8% 10.2% 0.4%      
Asian NA NA NA      
Hispanic 7.4% 7.4% 0.0%      
  (Civilian Labor Force in 1,000s)      
Total 146,471 146,650 179 0.1%    
White 120,540 120,542 2 0.0%    
Black 16,404 16,595 191 1.2%    
Asian 6,190 6,235 45 0.7%    
Hispanic 18,693 19,010 317 1.7%    
  (Labor Force Participation Rate)      
Total 65.9% 65.9% 0.0%      
White 66.2% 66.2% 0.0%      
Black 63.3% 64.0% 0.7%      
Asian 66.3% 66.4% 0.1%      
Hispanic 67.5% 68.4% 0.9%      
             

Source: BLS, "The Employment Situation: March 2004," April 2, 2004.

Tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/empsit.pdf      

 

Table2:

The U.S. Laborforce by Race and Nativity,

2002

(Numbers in 1,000s) Foreign Born
  Total U.S. Born Foreign Born Percent
All Races 122,497 104,776 17,721 14.5%
White, non-Hispanic 88,445 84,690 3,755 4.2%
Black, non-Hispanic 13,283 11,854 1,429 10.8%
Asian, non-Hispanic 5,600 1,084 4,516 80.6%
Hispanic 14,162 6,196 7,966 56.2%
         
Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), Bureau of Labor Statistics, unpublished data.
Available upon request.        

 

Edwin S. Rubenstein (email him) is President of ESR Research Economic Consultants in Indianapolis.