Moral Of That U.S.-Mexico Soccer Game: Say Goodbye to Los Angeles

Centuries before
William James
coined
the phrase,
men have sought a

"moral equivalent of war"
, some human endeavor to satisfy the
jingoistic lust of man, without the carnage of war.

For some, the
modern Olympic Games have served the purpose, with the
Cold War rivalry for medals between the United States
and the Soviet Union, and, lately, between America and
China.

But the Olympic
Games, most of which involve individual athletes
competing against each other, have never aroused the
passions of soccer, where teams serve as surrogates for
the tribe or nation.

Perhaps the most
intense rivalry today is

between Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona,
teams
representing Spain`s largest cities, with the former a
stand-in for nationalism and centralism and
"Barca" a
surrogate for Catalan separatism. During the

Civil War
, when

Catalonia was a bastion of loyalist resistance,
the
head of F.C. Barcelona was executed by troops loyal to
Gen. Franco.

Early this
month, Etgar Keret of
The New York Times
attended a match between Beitar Jerusalem, which is
associated with right-wing Israeli politics, and Bnei
Sakhnin, the only Arab-Jewish team in Israel`s first
division.

Keret
volunteered to a loud, visibly anxious Arab he met,
"It`s only a
game,"
and got this blistering reply:
"For you, maybe, because you`re a Jew. But for us, soccer is the only
place we`re equal in this stinking country."
[In
Israel, a Soccer Game Reflects a Divide,
June 3,
2011]

Throughout the
game, Israeli and Arab fans shouted ethnic slurs and
curses in the other`s language to be sure they were
understood. As Keret writes,
"The bad blood
between the two teams has caused many of their matches
to end in rock-throwing brawls."


"Soccer is often more deeply felt
than religion,"
says
Franklin Foer, author of

How Soccer Explains the World
. "I don`t see tribalism ever
really disappearing. … People are almost hardwired to
identify as groups. And … group identity always runs
the risk of being chauvinistic."

Which brings us
to Saturday`s match

in the fabled Rose Bowl,
with 93,000 in attendance,
between the

United States and Mexico.

According to
Bill Plaschke [Email
him
] of the
Los Angeles Times,
when the U.S. team took the field
it was "smothered
in boos. … Its goalkeeper was bathed in a chanted
obscenity. Even its national anthem was filled with the
blowing of air horns and bouncing of beach balls."
[In
Gold Cup final, it`s red, white and boo again
,
By Bill Plaschke,
Los Angeles Times,
June 25, 2011]

How did U.S.
coach Bob Bradley respond to the reception his team
received in America`s largest county? "Obviously …
the support that Mexico has on a night like this


makes it a home
game for them
."


"A home game"

for Mexico—in Pasadena?


"It`s part of something we had to
deal with"
, said the
coach.


"I have never heard more consistent
loud cheering for one team here,"

wrote Plaschke,
"from the air horns to the `Ole` chant with each Mexico
pass, all set to the soundtrack of low throbbing that
began in the parking lot six hours before the game and
continued long into the night."

After the 4-2
win by Mexico, for the first time, the trophy award
ceremony was held in the Rose Bowl. When the losing U.S.
team was introduced, the stadium rocked again with boos.


"We`re not booing the country. We`re
booing the team,"
one
rooter for Mexico told Plaschke.
"There`s a big difference."

But why would
scores of thousands boo a defeated team after a game?

Why would
spectators raise a ruckus during a national anthem,
except to manifest contempt for the country whose anthem
it was?

U.S. goalkeeper
Tim Howard credited several Mexican players with the
win, but he was disgusted at how the officials conducted
the ceremony awarding the Gold Cup title to Mexico.

They
"should be
ashamed of themselves,"
said
Howard.
"It
was a disgrace that the entire post-match ceremony was
in Spanish. You can bet your [expletive] that if we were
in Mexico City, it wouldn`t


if we were in Mexico Cit
y,
it wouldn`t be


all in English
."

Indeed, were
U.S. fans in a Mexican town to boo, jeer and chant
obscenities at a Mexican team before, during and after a
match, and blow horns during the

Mexican national anthem
, they would be lucky to get
out of the stadium alive.

What does this
event, in which Plaschke estimates 80,000 fans in the
Rose Bowl could not control their
contempt
for the U.S. team and for the U.S. national anthem
,
tell us?

We have within
our country 12-20 million illegal aliens, with Mexico
the primary source, and millions of others who may be
U.S. citizens but are not truly Americans.

As one fan told
Plaschke, "I was
born in Mexico, and that is where my heart will always
be."

Perhaps he
should go back there, and let someone take his place who
wants
to become an American.

By 2050,
according to Census figures, thanks to illegals crossing
over and legalized mass immigration,

the number of Hispanics in the U.S.A. will rise from
today`s 50 million to 135 million.

Say goodbye to
Los Angeles. Say goodbye to California.

COPYRIGHT

CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC.



Patrick J. Buchanan

needs

no introduction
to
VDARE.COM readers; his book
 
State
of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and
Conquest of America
, can
be ordered from Amazon.com. His latest book

is Churchill,
Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How
Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost
the World,

reviewed

here
by

Paul Craig Roberts.