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The Normalcy Of Pederasty Among Pakistanis
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September 10, 2014, 06:59 AM
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For the all-cultures-are-equal file, there’s this: in Pakistan, a substantial proportion of men believe having sex with little boys is normal and not abusive.

Ezra Levant had a brief segment on Canada’s Sun News about the normality of child rape in Pakistan, particularly of street boys. It sounds similar to the practice of grooming boys for sex in neighboring Afghanistan, called bacha bazi.

Levant cited a recent Daily Mail article describing a Pakistani bus driver who thought it was perfectly acceptable to rape little boys:

The bus driver who has raped 12 little boys (and doesn’t think he’s done anything wrong): Why thousands of Pakistani children are falling prey to paedophiles, Daily Mail, September 1, 2014

. . . But the children falling prey to these men aren’t the ones you might expect. With girls kept at home by their parents, the majority of victims are boys – some as young as six years old.

‘Once, there was a boy on the bus and everyone had sex with him,’ confesses Ijaz who admits to raping 12 different children during his career as a bus conductor.

As observed by Levant, these are the same men who murder their daughters for looking at a boy, aka “honor killing” as dictated by Muslim culture.

As of 2011, 307,877 persons born in Pakistan resided in the United States. How many of them think child sex abuse is acceptable?

Among the horrific child sex abuse in Rotherham England of girls, it should be noted that the perps are predominantly Pakistani.

Here’s Ezra Levant’s written analysis of the Pakistan abuse epidemic.

Pakistan’s troubling rape problem, Sun News Network, by Ezra Levant, September 9, 2014

There are 1.5 million street kids in Pakistan — an estimated 90% of them have been sexually abused at some point in their lives.

Rape in Pakistan is so common, it’s barely taboo. Last week the Daily Mail interviewed a bus driver from Peshawar who says, after his shift is over, he likes to go into the slums and rape street kids. Sometimes he pays them a dollar. But often he doesn’t – he just joins in a big gang rape.

“Once, there was a boy on the bus and everyone had sex with him,” he told theDaily Mail. “I did it too but what else could I do? They invited me. And he was that kind of boy anyway.” He says he’s raped 12 different children.

This wasn’t a solitary rapist, hiding in the shadows, afraid of being seen or being caught. This was men joining together, unworried about social norms, unworried about someone stopping them.

A poll of 1,800 Pakistani men found that a third don’t think raping street kids is a crime – and they don’t even think it’s a bad thing to do.

And then there’s so-called honour killings – where families kill their own daughters for social improprieties, real or perceived.

Every year close to 1,000 Pakistani girls are murdered by their own fathers, brothers or even mothers, for “moral indiscretions” ranging from going out on a date to dressing in western clothing to marrying the wrong man.

What a horrific duality — a country that has normalized the rape of children, but would rather murder its own daughters than have embarrassing gossip about them.

No wonder so many Pakistanis are happy to emigrate. Put aside the ongoing terrorist civil war, put aside official discrimination against minority religions, such as Christianity or even other Muslim denominations like the Ahmadiyyas — Pakistan drives out its best, those who want a better life, a life of freedom and peace and safety.

Canada is the lucky recipient of many such immigrants. The Sun’s columnist Tarek Fatah is a perfect example of that – someone so Canadian he probably has maple syrup in his veins. But not all Pakistani immigrants prefer our liberal values to those of the Peshawar bus driver.

Aqsa Parvez was a young woman who was murdered by her father and her brother for the honour crime of dressing and acting like a Canadian teenager. They imported the worst of Pakistan to Mississauga

Rotherham, UK, has received another import: mass rape gangs. Between 1997 and 2013, that city of just 250,000 had 1,400 girls – as young as 11 – systematically “groomed,” raped and prostituted by Pakistani gangs. Fourteen-hundred out of a city of 250,000. The girls were white Christians; in the eyes of the Pakistani Muslim gangs, they were sub-human, like Pakistan’s own street orphans.

Rotherham police knew all about it. But they were paralyzed with fear – fear of being called racist if they dared to act. They found the mass rape of a generation of the city’s girls less intolerable than the risk of being called politically incorrect or “Islamophobic.”

Back to Canada. Pakistan is the fourth largest source of immigrants to our country – nearly 100,000 in the past decade. Most of them are wonderful, peaceful Canadians, like Tarek. But how many are like the Peshawar bus driver, or the Rotherham rape gangs, or Muhammad Parvez?

Pakistan, like some other Muslim countries, has a rape problem. Perhaps before opening up the floodgates, we might want to do something as simple as asking a prospective immigrant for their views on women, rape and honour.