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Senator Marco Rubio Gets Heckled by Florida Audience over Amnesty
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August 31, 2013, 12:55 AM
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Washington’s top amnesty poodle received some well deserved condemnation during his Friday speech at the Americans for Prosperity conference in Orlando. But not to worry — he has been booed before and must be used to it by now.

Many friends of American sovereignty recall how candidate Rubio falsely portrayed himself as being an amnesty opponent, one who said that President Reagan made a mistake in 1986. But when Rubio arrived in the Senate, he became a willing front man for one of the worst pieces of legislation ever written, which is particularly forgiving toward violent criminals and puts public safety at risk. Rubio was such an effective liar that conservatives like Rush Limbaugh defended the Senator’s quisling behavior.

In the 2009 video clip below, candidate Rubio declared, “You cannot grant amnesty” and made all the right arguments about enforcement. But that principled viewpoint didn’t survive meeting up with billionaire supporters of cheap foreign labor like Facebook guy Mark Zuckerberg and the influence of open-borders Senators John McCain and Charles Schumer.

Marco Rubio heckled over immigration during speech to conservatives, Tampa Bay Times, August 30, 2013

ORLANDO — Sen. Marco Rubio knew it was coming, and it did — shouts and jeers from conservative activists over his role in immigration reform.

“Build the fence!” a man yelled as Rubio took the stage Friday at the Americans for Prosperity conference in Orlando. “No amnesty!” several people shouted throughout his address.

But the reception from the crowd of 1,500 was mostly enthusiastic for Rubio, who used his speech to denounce big government and Obamacare, the mention of which brought people to their feet.

Rubio also got loud applause when he criticized the Common Core education standards, which have come under assault form tea party activists who see the standards as a federal takeover. By extension, Rubio was jabbing at his mentor, former Gov. Jeb Bush, who is a major backer of Common Core and has worked to defend against the critics.

Rubio never mentioned immigration, but it was on the mind of many. He was one of eight senators who crafted a wide-ranging bill that would spend tens of billions on border security while also providing a pathway to citizenship for as many as 11 million undocumented residents, provided they pay fines and meet other standards.

“He lied about his position on amnesty,” said Jon Moseley, an activist from Lake Placid, Fla., referring to Rubio’s hard-line stance on immigration during his 2010 Senate campaign. “Now he’s the main face of amnesty.”

Bill Garner, 62, drove down from Georgia to attend the two-day conference. He said he once considered Rubio his No. 1 leader of the GOP. “I was strong on him for a long time, but I’m concerned right now because of immigration. It hurt hard.”

LeAnne King, a tea party member from Jacksonville, was likewise disappointed, but she attributed it to Rubio’s youth. “I haven’t given up on him,” she said. “Ask me in a week, ask me in a month.”