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"Is That Even a Thing?" The Concepts That Goodthinkers Don't Have
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April 17, 2016, 12:58 PM
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From the NYT:

Is That Even a Thing?

By ALEXANDER STERN APRIL 16, 2016

Speakers and writers of American English have recently taken to identifying a staggering and constantly changing array of trends, events, memes, products, lifestyle choices and phenomena of nearly every kind with a single label — a thing. In conversation, mention of a surprising fad, behavior or event is now often met with the question, “Is that actually a thing?” Or “When did that become a thing?” Or “How is that even a thing?” Calling something “a thing” is, in this sense, itself a thing.

I use “a thing” in that sense to mean a recognized conceptual category. The more Things you are aware of, the more you can describe the world. For example, if you don’t know that “hate hoaxes” are a Thing, then you are constantly being surprised when the latest story about fraternity initiation gang rapes on broken glass turns out not to be true.

In contrast, Newspeak in Orwell’s 1984 is intended to reduce the number of Things in the cognitive universe:

When Oldspeak had been once and for all superseded, the last link with the past would have been severed. History had already been rewritten, but fragments of the literature of the past survived here and there, imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one’s knowledge of Oldspeak it was possible to read them. In the future such fragments, even if they chanced to survive, would be unintelligible and untranslatable. It was impossible to translate any passage of Oldspeak into Newspeak unless it either referred to some technical process or some very simple everyday action, or was already orthodox (goodthinkful would be the Newspeak expression) in tendency. In practice this meant that no book written before approximately 1960 could be translated as a whole. Pre-revolutionary literature could only be subjected to ideological translation — that is, alteration in sense as well as language. Take for example the well-known passage from the Declaration of Independence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among men, deriving their powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of Government becomes destructive of those ends, it is the right of the People to alter or abolish it, and to institute new Government. . .

It would have been quite impossible to render this into Newspeak while keeping to the sense of the original. The nearest one could come to doing so would be to swallow the whole passage up in the single word crimethink.

To control what is a Thing and what is not a Thing is to have deep power over the thoughts of men.

[Comment at Unz.com]