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GOP's Wehby Cratering In OR Senate Race With 35% White Share—While Anti-Illegal Campaign Romps
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October 20, 2014, 01:43 PM
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GOP Establishment pick Monica Wehby, after ignoring the immigration issue and trying to out-liberal Democratic incumbent Senator Jeff Merkley on the ludicrous issue of how much he pays female staffers, is of course losing:
SALEM, Ore. — Just five months ago, Oregon's Senate race looked as if it could be a tough one.

Republican Monica Wehby appeared to have all the right credentials to challenge incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley. A pediatric neurosurgeon and mother of four, she appealed to moderate Republicans fed up with Obamacare and big government.

But polls now put Wehby behind by 10 to 15 percentage points.

(GOP Senate challenger Wehby fades in Oregon, by Tracy Lowe, USA Today, October 19 2014. Link in original)

The latest poll, by New York Times/ CBS News/ YouGov/Battleground Tracker concluded October 1, shows Merkely leading Wehby 49%-35%. Weirdly, the poll does not seem to break out Black and Hispanic results in this heavily white state, but a Rasmussen poll on September 2-3, which showed Merkely leading 48%-35% (not much change in this race), showed essentially the same gap (46%-34%) in its "Other" (non-white) racial category, whom it estimated at 16% of the likely voters.

It's unusual, and frankly odd, for white and non-white voting patterns to be so similar. But the bottom line: Wehby has utterly failed to motivate white a.k.a. American voters.

This is especially disgraceful because Measure 88, the state's attempt to give driver's licenses to illegals, seems set to be defeated overwhelmingly, 60%-31% according to a recent Oregon Public Broadcasting/ Fox-12 Survey—despite the fact that, as usual, the tiny band of immigration patriots who forced this vote are being outspent 10-1.

Wehby, needless to say, has declined to take a position on Measure 88.

This is shaping up to be pattern. Montana passed an anti-illegal initiative overwhelmingly in 2012, while the GOP Senate and gubernatorial candidates stayed silent—and lost.