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Drug Cartels Bribe Mexican Journalists for Good Press—Coming To Your Home Town Paper Next
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September 24, 2014, 02:20 PM
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Video includes extensive Spanish-language profanity and obscenity

As American leaders abandon their responsibility to safeguard American sovereignty, new forces will fill the vacuum.  One of the most important players will be the Mexican drug cartels, who are becoming a political force in their own right in their home country.
A new video showing two influential Mexican reporters taking wads of cash from a notorious drug lord suggests the long tendrils of cartel influence have established a grip in the country’s journalism industry, as has been rumored for years.

The video, which was published yesterday by Mexican news site MVS, shows two reporters from Mexico’s troubled Michoacan state appearing to accept money from one of the country’s most wanted drug lords, Servando Gomez, leader of the Knights Templar Cartel. The men then discuss a “communication strategy” to improve the cartel’s image and are heard asking for trucks and cameras.

[Video shows Mexican drug lord paying journalists for 'good press' by Manuel Rueda, Fusion, September 22, 2014]

Ultimately, mass immigration is about state breakdown.  The American ruling class has made a collective decision that it either can't — or won't — enforce the law.  As a result, non-state actors move to take control over activities that once belonged to the state.  Taken to its most extreme extent, we get the Fourth Generation Warfare of failed states where gangs, tribes, and religious groups battle for control of resources.

Despite its relative wealth, vast swathes of Mexico are lawless zones.  Beheadings and public executions have been conducted by the cartels long before ISIS was ever heard of.  Police and soldiers cover their faces before appearing before cameras, lest their families face reprisals.  And in the absence of state authority, the local crime boss essentially becomes the sovereign.

How much longer before drag cartels become a political force in parts of what used to be our country?