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Black "Anti-Racist" Trevor Phillips Proclaims "A Fact Cannot Be Racist," Gets Called Racist
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March 19, 2015, 07:17 AM
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When you've lost Trevor Phillips...

The former head of the "Equalities and Human Rights Commission," Trevor Phillips, OBE, is producing a new documentary called "10 Things We Can't Say About Race That Are True."

They include —

1) Most black murder victims are killed by blacks 2) Street grooming gangs come from the Pakistani Mirpuri community 3) Romanians are far more likely to be pickpockets 4) Alcohol-fuelled crime is committed by white Britons 5) Black Britons are twice as likely to be sentenced for violent crime 6) Smart parents put their kids in class with Asians 7) White (and poor) is the new black 8) Irish people run the building trade 9) Jewish households are twice as wealthy as the rest 10) Indian women are eight times as likely to be chemists

["A Fact Cannot Be Racist," Says Trevor PhillipsLBC, March 19, 2015]

Of course, a fact CAN be racist.  We call them "hate facts."

But even "hate facts," as the man says, are stubborn things.  The result of Phillips's documentary has been a gratifying outbreak of some #realtalk in the British media.

Phillips explains how British people, who dared to express any concern about the rapidly changing face of their country, were shouted down as racist or a bigot. Remember, that’s how Gordon Brown described Labour voter Gillian Duffy in 2010. Looking back, Mrs Duffy was rather measured in her complaints, considering the poor woman lived in the once-respectable town of Rotherham, now the child sex-grooming capital of the Western world, thanks to a group of Pakistani men who make up just 5 per cent of the local population.

“Like many people faced with inconvenient truths, I thought if I sat on them long enough they’d go away,” says Phillips with a self-knowledge that is rare in our governing classes. Far more typical are the touchy censors who, Phillips reveals, withdrew a timely 2008 film for schools showing a twentysomething South Asian groomer luring white teenage girls into a fancy car and a life of degradation. That was way too realistic, unfortunately, so a second film was made where the groomer was a white teenager. This bore no resemblance to any present danger to any girl ever, but at least it wasn’t offending someone’s culture, except possibly white people. Bad luck, we don’t count.

[We must listen to Trevor Phillips and his inconvenient truths about raceby Allison Pearson, Telegraph, March 19, 2015]

And as you might expect, those who derive their living from shrieking about racism (the Parasitic Class) are demanding action be taken against the Class Traitor.
Anti-racism organisations have suggested that Mr Phillips has “lost touch with reality”. A spokesman for the Show Racism the Red Card campaign said: “It is not multiculturalism which has created a belief ‘that you can’t say anything’ or the concept of a ‘PC Brigade’ – and it was not the CRE, community groups or charities which came up with the idea of ‘branding people racist’.

[Trevor Phillips condemned by anti-racism groupsby Chris Green, Telegraph, March 16, 2015]

My favorite part,
“The narrative we see in the Daily Mail and by Mr Phillips himself feed into a misguided belief that there are minority communities up and down the county trying to curtail debate and freedom of speech.
Yes, what could give us that idea?
This diverts our attention, perhaps conveniently, away from having conversations about the daily occurrences of discrimination experienced by minority communities and the complex conditions which create unrest.
Notice the shifting of the goalposts, as "discrimination" shifts from violence, abusive speech, or denying people jobs or education into "complex conditions which create unrest" which can never really be defined but can always be blamed on white people.
Mr Phillips said that after spending a year at the CRE – which later became the Equality and Human Rights Commission – he had lost all faith in multiculturalism. While “beautiful in theory”, he said it had become “a racket in which self-styled community leaders bargained for control over local authority funds that would prop up their own status and authority”.
I would disagree with the "beautiful in theory" part.  But the reason multiculturalism endures is that so many people have a vested interest (and a financial interest) in the preservation of a climate of fear.

After all, just ask Al Sharpton.