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A Reader Has Two Stories Of The War On Christmas, Both Positive
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December 09, 2014, 04:41 PM
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Re: War On Christmas Competition Announcement 2014: We Didn’t Start The Fire!

From: Mitchell Day [Email him ]

Here are two stories of the War On Christmas, both of which say we’re winning.

Houston lawmaker raising awareness about Texas' Merry Christmas law

By Matt Aufdenspring, Click2Houston.com

AUSTIN, Texas -

A state representative from Houston is raising awareness for Texas' Merry Christmas Law that allows teachers, students, parents and school administrators to celebrate traditional winter holidays like Christmas and Hanukkah in public schools without fear of censorship, persecution or litigation.

Dwayne Bohac (R-Houston) and Richard Raymond (D-Laredo) held a press conference Monday morning at the State Capitol. The bill, which was authored by Bohac and joint-authored by Raymond, passed unanimously in 2013.[More]

Second, this piece from the Christian Science Monitor—a more thorough coverage of the issue.
'Merry Christmas' returns: How conservatives are winning the Christmas war

'Merry Christmas' and 'Happy Hanukkah' are now protected speech in Texas schools. And, major retail chains are also turning away from 'Happy Holidays' in favor of 'Merry Christmas.' How did this shift happen?

By Husna Haq, December 9, 2014

Wishing students "Merry Christmas" is now protected in Texas public schools thanks to a recently minted Merry Christmas law, which allows students, teachers, and administrators to say traditional holiday greetings on campus.

"That allows parents, teachers, students and school administrators to celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah in public schools without fear of censorship, litigation or persecution," State Rep. Dwayne Bohac told a local Austin ABC affiliate. Bohac, along with State Rep. Richard Raymond, authored House Bill 308, also known as the "Merry Christmas" law.

The bill, signed into law last year by Gov. Rick Perry, allows religious scenes and symbols, like a nativity or Christmas tree, to be displayed on school property. It also allows schools to teach about religious holidays, including their history, and include religious references and music in school performances.[More, links in original]

See Mitchell Day’s earlier letter about Frederick Russell Burnham.

James Fulford writes: The answer to Husna Haq’s question above (“How did this shift happen?”) is that people at the grass roots pushed back.