Internationallaw
Trump Cuts Off Visas For Countries That Won't Take Back Their Criminals—"Minorities" Hardest Hit
Thumb generalissimo
September 15, 2017, 01:42 PM
A+
|
a-
Print Friendly and PDF
The Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security have finally moved to punish countries that refuse to accept their citizens being deported from the United States.  This was a move a long time coming, and should have happened months ago.  But the real story is that there are no lawsuits.
The Trump administration announced Wednesday it has ordered the State Department to limit certain visas for Cambodia, Eritrea, Guinea, and Sierra Leone because those countries have refused to accept the return of its nationals who are deported from the United States.

"International law obligates each country to accept the return of its nationals ordered removed from the United States," Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke said in a statement. "Cambodia, Eritrea, Guinea, and Sierra Leone have failed in that responsibility. The United States itself routinely cooperates with foreign governments in documenting and accepting its citizens when asked, as do the majority of countries in the world. However, these countries have failed to do so, and that one-way street ends with these sanctions."

[Trump Cuts Off Visas For Countries That Refuse Deported Immigrants, by Anna Giaritelli, Washington Examiner, September 13, 2017]

The most flagrant violator, the People's Republic Of China, was left off this action list.  And interestingly there seemed to be a hierarchy in the nature of the visa cut-off.  Yellow countries had the least punitive measures and black countries had the most punitive.
"The U.S. Embassy in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, has discontinued the issuance of B visas (temporary visitors for business or pleasure) for Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs employees, with the rank of Director General and above, and their families. The U.S. Embassy in Asmara, Eritrea, has discontinued the issuance of all B visas (temporary visitors for business or pleasure)," the State Department announced.

"The United States Embassy in Conakry, Guinea, has discontinued the issuance of B visas (temporary visitors for business or pleasure), and F, J, and M visas (temporary visitors for student and exchange programs) to Guinean government officials and their immediate family members," the memo stated. "The United States Embassy in Freetown, Sierra Leone, has discontinued the issuance of B visas (temporary visitors for business or pleasure) to Ministry of Foreign Affairs officials and immigration officials."

Of the nations though, Cambodia (or Kampuchea) is the most flagrant violator, but only a small number of their citizens will be refused visas, an almost miniscule number of refusals.  Eritrea gets the harshest treatment, a total cut off.  All the nations singled out were non-white, all poor, and the nature of the visa refusals differentiated by race and nationality, and the most flagrant violators got the least punishment.  One would think that there would be a 14th Amendment or 4th Amendment claim in there if the claims about the terrorism ban were true, that aliens have a right to due process and non-discrimination in the entry and admission of aliens.

Interestingly there are no lawsuits.  No claims in the press, by the Treason Bar, or the Cultural Marxists that this violates the rights of these aliens to enter into the United States and visit their relatives here.

It does expose the ongoing lawsuits against the ban that President Trump imposed on certain other nations for supporting terrorism and hostility to the United States.  It should be something that the Administration points out to the Supreme Court, that no alien has a right to enter the United States and the Congress of the United States has granted the President the authority to ban any individual or group of persons from entering the United States.  It is called precedent in legal-speak.