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Substitute Killer Sent from Pakistan?
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October 15, 2010, 09:36 PM
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A recent intelligence report informs us that the Pakistan Taliban has sent a replacement mass murderer to take the place of Faisal Shazad, who couldnt get his bombs to explode in Times Square.

Apparently Pakistanis can easily enter the United States like any friendly neighbor, despite polling data showing that the majority of Pakistanis regard America as an enemy. Why would anyone in Washington bother to create immigration policies designed with national security in mind?

We wouldnt want to hurt anyones feelings in Pakistan. Come one, come all.

New Pakistani Taliban Operative Feared Inside U.S. After Times Square Failure, Fox News, October 14, 2010

Senior U.S. officials are concerned over recent intelligence indicating that the Pakistani Taliban, which orchestrated the failed Times Square bombing, may have successfully placed another operative inside the United States to launch a second attack, sources tell Fox News. Authorities, however, know very little about the potential operative or any possible plot.

[We] dont know who it is and dont know where it is, one source said. We know the guys here, but dont know anything about him.

Based on the intelligence, authorities believe the Pakistani Taliban, also known as Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan, would have directed the individual to attempt another Times Square-style operation, but not necessarily in New York City.

A senior intelligence official said the threat streams lack of specificity makes it nearly impossible for the counterterrorism community to defend against such an attack. Any possible threat, however, does not seem to be imminent, with a senior counterterrorism official saying he was unaware of any imminent threats against the U.S. homeland.

Nevertheless, the Pakistani Taliban has been looking to make up for its previous failure. Authorities believe the subject of the latest intelligence would use a similar mechanism and the same modus operandi employed by 31-year-old Faisal Shahzad in May, mostly because its easily accessible here, as one source put it. [. . .]

Authorities are describing the latest threat as credible but not specific, and they are very nervous, according to the sources. Its unclear exactly when or how the intelligence was obtained, but one source said it was corroborated by authorities. Others were unable to say the intelligence had been corroborated.