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San Francisco Update to Sanctuary City Policy: Only Convicted Axe Murderers May Be Deported
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May 26, 2016, 07:08 AM
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The city’s Board of Supervisors met on Tuesday to sort out whether the current coddling of illegal aliens should be changed following the shocking death of Kate Steinle last July at the hands of a five-times-deported criminal. Unsurprisingly, the supes only clarified the enormous extent to which illegal aliens, including convicted criminals, are protected in San Francisco: the supervisors specified that only defendants charged with a violent crime and convicted of a violent crime within the past seven years can be referred to ICE for deportation. That is a rather limited category, one that protects foreign criminals rather than public safety.

Keep in mind that Steinle’s killer, Mexican Francisco Sanchez, admitted in a jailhouse confession that he moved to San Francisco because of its sanctuary policy, showing the program’s attraction to foreign criminals.

The pro-criminal outcome is not a surprise to anyone who has followed San Francisco’s descent into the love of murder diversity. If the 2008 triple murder of the Bologna family by an undeported MS-13 gangster who had attacked a pregnant woman on a bus didn’t convince the foggy anarchists to hand over dangerous foreigners to ICE, then nothing would.

Fox New reported on the San Francisco supervisors’ decision:

MARTHA MCCALLUM: San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously voting to uphold their so-called sanctuary city policy despite coming under fire this past year when 32-year-old Kate Steinle was shot and killed by a convicted felon who was living in the United States illegally, her accused killer protected by that controversial policy. Adam Housley, live in San Francisco where it seems like nothing is going to change because of all that. Good morning, Adam.

ADAM HOUSLEY: Yeah Martha, nothing’s going to change in that unanimously approved legislation which upholds the sanctuary city law. Remember the backlash, you touched on it, with Kate Steinle who was killed here last year. The man who she was killed by was wanted by ICE and was not turned over because of the sanctuary city law in San Francisco. Now what this measure does basically is it clarifies the protections available to illegal immigrants here, the measure calling for law enforcement officers to notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE only if a defendant is charged with a violent crime and has been convicted of a violent crime within the last seven years. That would be the only time city workers, including police officers, could disclose immigration status. Supervisor John Avalos sponsored the legislation.

JOHN AVALOS: What it would do is make sure that we’re very clear about who is responsible for any part of the workaround detaining people and notifying people, notifying ICE.

HOUSLEY: The San Francisco sheriff is resisting the limitation, says she wanted more say in the whole situation. She was elected here, of course, and would not necessarily have to follow this new city rule.

MCCALLUM: It’s got to make people think twice about the safety of that city, given what’s happened.