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Poll: Obama Immigration Policy Meets Disapproval
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September 14, 2010, 12:00 PM
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Obama’s leadership strategy: discern the opinion of the majority of citizens; do the opposite.

Or maybe it just seems that way.

At any rate, his anti-borders globalist agenda is available for all to see, and the voters don’t like it.

Immigration issues hurting Obama, poll finds, Los Angeles Times, September 13, 2010

Immigration issues, including questions about who should have U.S. citizenship, have hurt President Obama’s standing with voters, according to the latest Quinnipiac University national poll.

The poll, carried out during the first week in September, found that respondents had a strong anti-immigrant tilt, favoring, by 68% to 24%, stricter enforcement of immigration laws rather than integrating illegal immigrants into society and, by 48% to 45%, an end to the constitutionally guaranteed practice of granting U.S. citizenship to children born of illegal immigrants.

With members of Congress back in Washington for a short session before leaving to campaign, no one is expecting lawmakers to move on an issue as divisive as immigration reform. But some Republicans are pushing for congressional hearings on the birth issue, which conservatives have propelled into a campaign theme in races in which tea party movement candidates are running viable races.

Estimates vary, but there are about 4 million children of illegal immigrants who are U.S. citizens by right of birth in this country. Many are the children of settled illegal immigrants, but conservatives argue that women are sneaking into the country to give birth and gain U.S. citizenship for their children.

�Many Americans want to end �birthright citizenship,’ an issue some Republican senators want to explore through congressional hearings,� said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. �Voters were told that �our Constitution and current laws’ blessed the practice, and the prospect of having to change one or both apparently doesn’t faze them.�

The electoral impact of the issue seems limited. Democratic respondents favored granting citizenship by 62% to 31%, while Republican and independent respondents oppose it by 67% to 27% and 51% to 42%, respectively.

There are a couple of noteworthy points in this poll. One is the very strong support for enforcement (68%) versus amnesty (24%). The poll question is: �24. Do you think immigration reform should primarily move in the direction of integrating illegal immigrants into American society or in the direction of stricter enforcement of laws against illegal immigration?�

(See the raw data from Quinnipiac.)

Another item of interest is the desire of voters to eliminate the anchor baby magnet. Some restrictionists opine that any enforcement applied toward adorable precious innocent BABIES is politically verboten, that removing a wrongfully obtained benefit is somehow harmful to children.

On the contrary, polling indicates that Americans understand this issue and want the anchor baby loophole fixed, as similarly shown by Rasmussen polls in which 64% of Arizonans reject citizenship for anchor babies as do 58% of Americans.

Below, in 2006 anchor quadruplets were added to the pre-existing six jackpot children of the Magdaleno family of Los Angeles.