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"Operation Airborne Homecoming": The American Dream For Immigration Patriots, Circa 2018
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March 07, 2018, 07:51 AM
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A steady annoyance for those of us in the ranks of immigration patriots is the routine capture of language in service of nation-destroying ends.  For example, illegal aliens become “undocumented immigrants.”  Mass amnesty of illegal aliens becomes “immigration reform.”  Routine deportation of illegal aliens—or other alien scofflaws—becomes “breaking up families.”  Et cetera.

These days the omnipresent misnomer that really gets my teeth grinding is “Dreamers.”  The term is surely intended to conjure the image of a legion of idealists, bubbling with frustrated patriotism for their beloved America and desiring only to be unleashed by “immigration reform” (i.e. what would be the eighth mass amnesty), so they can fulfill their obvious destinies as valedictorians, Medal of Honor candidates, and budding Nobelists—and thereby redeem American society.

(The realities of the "Dreamers" and their DACA-ite sub-cohort are laid out in The DACA Myth: What Americans Need to Know [PDF; from FAIR, October 2017] and Fmr. USCIS Investigator: There’s a ‘Huge’ Amount of Fraud in DACA, by Margaret Menge, Lifezette, November 21, 2017.)

Of course, the cloying term "Dreamer" builds upon the "DREAM Act," the title for congressional mass-amnesty legislation that has been introduced, in varying forms, multiple times since 2001.  (It has always failed to pass Congress, but some of the attempts have come uncomfortably close.)  And the "DREAM" in "DREAM Act" stands for "Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors."  In years past, I've even seen objections (in the context of immigration battles) to the term "alien," even though it's simply a synonym for "non-citizen" and its use in U.S. law goes back to at least the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798.  But when they can incorporate it in the heart-strings-tugging acronym "DREAM," the word apparently passes muster among the open-border-ites.

Anyway, commenter Calvert Whitehurst at Mark Steyn's website recently had a refreshing take on the "dreamer" trope:

As a dreamer in my own way, I have a long and growing list of people to whose backs I dream of strapping parachutes and pushing them out of airplanes flying over North Korea, Afghanistan, Somalia and northern Nigeria. Also, I dream of putting together a chart of zip codes combining the highest incomes and real estate values with the highest percentages of Democratic voters; then putting illegal immigrants on buses and going house to house dropping them off. And while you may say that I'm a dreamer, I bet I'm not the only one who has those dreams.
Yes, Mr. Whitehurst: You're not the only one!

During the election campaign, Kevin Drum, outraged by Trump's promise to pressure recalcitrant countries to accept their criminal aliens back (a promise he has kept) claimed in a headline that  Donald Trump Plans to Parachute Criminals Into Other Countries Whether They Like It Or Not, September 1, 2016.

James Fulford wrote

Of course, Trump's plan for "murderous illegal immigrants" is simply to send them back normally after persuading the sending country to receive them, with notice to those countries' officials who may want to meet the plane, and have a word with the criminals.

But how many of you, seeing Drum's headline about a plan to "Parachute Criminals" into recalcitrant countries thought "That would be awesome!"

See Kevin Drum's MOTHER JONES Parachute Plan For Criminal Aliens—A Modest Proposal, for more.