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"Moderate Muslim" rally underwhelms Washington
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May 16, 2005, 02:35 AM
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What if "moderate Muslims" living in America gave a march against terrorism and nobody came? Unsurprisingly, that`s what happened Saturday in the nation`s capital. [ Local group leads march against terror, 5/14/05 ] Only about 50 people showed up, and not all of them were sons of Allah. So much for the alleged community of Muslims who are assimilated and support the American values like individual freedom, women`s rights and non-theocratic government.

Pictures of the tiny crowd here and also here.

    "We have to be honest; we have a problem with extremism, and the Muslim leadership in this country has totally failed us," said Kamal Nawash, leader of the year-old organization.

    "While [the leaders] themselves don`t support terrorism, they share the ideology of the terrorists, which is this delusion about creating a theocratic Muslim state. ... We`re here to offer an ideological challenge to extremism and the ideology that causes extremism and terrorism."

That`s a subtle difference, to say the least, that Muslim leadership in the USA merely "shares the ideology of terrorists." Imagine our relief. And the "theocratic Muslim state" refers to Islamists` objective of turning the United States into another Taliban Afghanistan, loony as that sounds. Omar M. Ahmad, chairman of the board of the terrorist-supporting Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), remarked in 1998 :

    "If you choose to live here (in America)... you have a responsibility to deliver the message of Islam," [Ahmad] said.

    "Islam isn`t in America to be equal to any other faith, but to become dominant," he said. "The Koran, the Muslim book of scripture, should be the highest authority in America, and Islam the only accepted religion on Earth," he said.

There was another attempt at a "moderate Muslim" march last year in Phoenix, organized by Dr. Zuhdi Jasser. The result was similarly lackluster, with about 250 attending, according to the Arizona Republic. The Muslim community of Phoenix is estimated to be 50,000.

As we approach the four-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, there is no sign that Muslims living in America have assimilated on a basic level of simple loyalty, nor to the more advanced degree that wartime conditions require. (Remember that in WWII, some Japanese-Americans in internment camps volunteered for military service to prove their patriotism; there has been no similar rush to recruitment in Detroit.)

They are building separate enclaves where the call to prayer is heard on American city streets and are sending their children to schools which promote anti-Semitism and hatred of America. A recent Freedom House study found that Saudis were filling US mosques with seditious, hate-filled material and admonishing Muslims in the United States to "behave as if on a mission behind enemy lines."

The question is why our government still allows Muslim immigration, particularly from nations that are clearly not friends. We should learn for the European experience with Muslim immigration that even a little can cause a lot of trouble.