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America's Senator, Jeff Sessions, Says the Administration Won't Enforce Immigration Laws Now on the Books
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November 10, 2014, 07:18 PM
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Senator Sessions appeared on Fox News Thursday night to lay out strategy to defend the integrity of Congress and the Constitutional separation of powers, which are threatened by Obama’s long-pledged amnesty for millions of foreign lawbreakers.

In answer to Megyn Kelly’s question about a possible impeachment of the would-be king, Sessions answered,

“We have plenty of tools and we have to use every one of them. Look, the American people have pleaded with congress and presidents for 30 years — they’ve asked pleaded and demanded, really, a lawful system of immigration that serves the national interest. President Obama is decimating law enforcement in a host of ways; this is just one of them.”
Sessions observed also that “People who supported the Gang of Eight bill, Senator McCain and others, have condemned roundly the President’s executive amnesty proposal. He pleaded with the President not to do it and others have said the same thing.”

Below, the Gang of Eight senators, who wrote their amnesty bill behind closed doors.

Kelly spouted the amnesty talking point that the Senate bill provided increased enforcement along with a path to citizenship for millions of foreigners, to which Sessions responded:

“It would double the number of workers coming into the country to take jobs. It would have gone from 10 million people getting permanent legal status in America over the next 10 years to 30 and would not be an effective enforcement tool as we demonstrated and that’s why the House said it was dead on arrival when it arrived over there. It did not do the job. The talking points they put out were good and sounded wonderful, but when you read the bill, it did not do what they promised.

So we’ve got to write a bill that will work. Yes, we can do that, but the biggest part of the problem is that they won’t enforce the laws that are on the books. They won’t do the job now. We’ve got a lot of laws that simply are not being enforced, encouraging more and more people to come unlawfully, putting extreme pressure on working Americans, whose wages are down and whose employment prospects are down.”

(See Sessions’ Ten Questions for the Gang of Eight from 2013 for a reminder of what a terrible piece of legislation the bill was.)

Part of the discussion centered on a letter from several concerned Republican senators to current Majority Leader Harry Reid, which follows:

Dear Leader Reid:

We write to express our alarm with President Obama’s announced intention to take unilateral executive action by the end of this year to lawlessly grant amnesty to immigrants who have entered the country illegally. The Supreme Court has recognized that “over no conceivable subject is the power of Congress more complete” than its power over immigration. Therefore, President Obama will be exercising powers properly belonging to Congress if he makes good on his threat. This will create a constitutional crisis that demands action by Congress to restore the separation of powers.

As majority leader of the Senate, you have the responsibility of not only representing the voters of your State, but also of protecting the Constitution through vigilant exercise of the checks and balances provided under the Constitution. Therefore, we write to offer our full assistance in ensuring expeditious Senate debate and passage for a measure that preserves the power of Congress by blocking any action the President may take to violate the Constitution and unilaterally grant amnesty; however, should you decline to defend the Senate and the Constitution from executive overreach, the undersigned Senators will use all procedural means necessary to return the Senate’s focus during the lame duck session to resolving the constitutional crisis created by President Obama’s lawless amnesty.

Sincerely,

Ted Cruz (R-Texas)

David Vitter (R-La.)

Mike Crapo (R-Idaho)

Mike Lee (R-Utah)

Pat Roberts (R-Kan.)

Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.)