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National Data | Chart | Homeland Security`s Misplaced Faith in Religious Visas
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October 19, 2005, 05:00 AM
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Table 1:

Admitted to the U.S., 1992-2004

 

Workers in Religious

Spouses and Children of

 

 

Occupations (R1 visas)

R1 Workers (R2 visas)

Total

1992

2,577

701

3,278

1993

4,444

1,051

5,495

1994

5,951

1,606

7,557

1995

6,742

1,790

8,532

1996

8,992

1,922

10,914

1998

10,863

2,350

13,213

1999

12,687

3,094

15,781

2000

15,342

3,930

19,272

2001

17,122

4,404

21,526

2002

19,115

5,348

24,463

2003

20,272

6,105

26,377

2004

21,571

6,443

28,014

 

 

 

 

Source: Office of Immigration Statistics, 2004 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, Table 24.

 

 

Table 2:

Religious Workers Admitted From

Moslem, non-Moslem Countries, 2004

 

 

All Countries

21,571

Moslem countries (a)

793

Non-Moslem countries

20,778

Ten Largest Countries of Citizenship

 

India

1,820

Mexico

1,814

Canada

1,425

United Kingdom

1,123

Korea

1,045

Israel

905

Japan

747

Philippines

729

Argentina

707

Colombia

617

 

 

Source: Office of Immigration Statistics, Yearbook of Immigration Statistics

2004. Table 25

 

 

Table 3:

Religious Workers Admitted

 

1999

2001

2003

2004

All Countries

12,687

17,122

20,272

21,571

Afganistan

1

3

NA

0

Saudi Arabia

2

8

5

10

Pakistan

47

79

39

21

Iraq

4

10

D

D

Iran

1

8

5

9

Indonesia

26

54

59

60

Yemen

0

1

NA

0

Syria

8

12

D

8

United Arab Emirates

5

2

NA

NA

Egypt

116

196

70

108

Israel

217

666

737

905

Source: Office of Immigration Statistics, Yearbook of Immigration Statistics (various

years). Table 25

 

D Disclosure standards not met.

 

 

 

NA Not available.

 

 

 

 

 

Edwin S. Rubenstein (email him) is President of ESR Research Economic Consultants in Indianapolis.