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National Data | Chart | Immigration Impacting All—But Still Hurts Poor More
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April 07, 2004, 05:00 AM
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Table 1:

      Immigrant Laborforce by Education

and Ethnicity, 2002

 

 

High School

High School or

College

Race/Hispanic Origin

Total

Dropouts

Some College

Graduates *

 

(Number in 1,000s)

All Races

17,721

5,025

7,235

5,461

White

3,755

344

1,730

1,681

Black

1,429

242

768

419

Hispanic

7,966

3,735

3,340

891

Asian

4,516

418

1,654

2,444

 

(Percent of Educational Levels by Race)

All Races

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

White

21.2%

6.8%

23.9%

30.8%

Black

8.1%

4.8%

10.6%

7.7%

Hispanic

45.0%

74.3%

46.2%

16.3%

Asian

25.5%

8.3%

22.9%

44.8%

 

(Percent of  Race by Educational Levels)

All Races

100.0%

28.4%

40.8%

30.8%

White

100.0%

9.2%

46.1%

44.8%

Black

100.0%

16.9%

53.7%

29.3%

Hispanic

100.0%

46.9%

41.9%

11.2%

Asian

100.0%

9.3%

36.6%

54.1%

 

 

 

 

 

* BA degree or more.

 

 

 

Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), Bureau of Labor Statistics, unpublished data.

Available upon request.

 

 

 

 

Table 2:

U.S. Labor Force by Education

 

and Nativity, 2002

 

 

 

 

 

Percent

 

Education Level

Total

U.S. Born

Immigrant

Immigrant

 

 

(Numbers in 1,000s)

 

High School Dropouts

12,599

7,574

5,025

39.9%

 

High School Graduates

71,380

64,145

7,235

10.1%

 

College Graduates *

38,518

33,057

5,461

14.2%

 

   Total

122,497

104,776

17,721

14.5%

 

 

 

 

 

* BA degree or more.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), Bureau of Labor Statistics, unpublished data.

 

Available upon request.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edwin S. Rubenstein (email him) is President of ESR Research Economic Consultants in Indianapolis.