My Zimmerman Question To The NYT Answered

From the New York Times:

Police Missteps in Trayvon Martin Case: Readers’ Questions Answered 

By SERGE F. KOVALESKI 

Thank you all for submitting such thoughtful questions and insights into the article [“Trayvon Martin Case Shadowed by a Series of Missteps“] about how the Sanford Police Department handled the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, 17, on the night of Feb. 26. ….

Q. Has any solid evidence emerged after all these months of media frenzy that the story George Zimmerman told the police wasn’t true?

Steve Sailor * 

A. Some Sanford officers were skeptical about certain details of Mr. Zimmerman’s account. For instance, he told the police that Mr. Martin had punched him numerous times, but they questioned whether his injuries were consistent with the number of blows he claimed to have received. They also suspected that some of the threatening and dramatic language that Mr. Zimmerman said Mr. Martin used during the struggle — like “You are going to die tonight” — sounded made up.

And there you have it …

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* By the way, The New York Times` misspelling of my name is no big deal, but it reminds me of why I`ve chosen to use a variety of handles that are easier for other people to spell than “Steven Sailer.” In elementary school, I noticed that people tended to spell my name “Stephen Sailer” or “Steven Sailor” or “Stephen Saylor,” or other variants. And who can blame them? It`s naturally confusing.

So, to simplify things for everybody, I decided to use Steve to eliminate the Steven/Stephen problem. Online, I emphasize Steve over Sailer because the former is almost impossible to misspell. I picked iSteve.com because somebody beat me to Steve.com. I use SteveSlr as an email address to get rid of those hard to remember vowels in my last name.

I`d recommend to parents that when choosing a baby name, they consider the inconvenience an unconventionally spelled name can impose on their child, and even the inconvenience their child`s altered spelling can cause other children with the conventional spelling.