Blonde Newsreaders, Rape, Murder, And “The Power of Racial Privilege”


Amy Larocca (right) a writer for New York Magazine’s The Cut,  is a brunette, as you might have expected from Sailer’s Law Of Female Journalism, which is that “The most heartfelt articles by female journalists tend to be demands that social values be revolutionized in order that the journalist herself will be considered hotter-looking.”

In Political Peroxide | Blonde privilege, August 10, 2017she writes

“Fox News and Donald Trump have given blonde hair a new chapter: Now, blonde is the color of the right, for whom whiteness has become a hallmark. Over the past decade or so, as inclusiveness became the hallmark of Obama-era liberals, the left found feminist icons in Rachel Maddow, Samantha Power, and Michelle Obama, who make no apologies for their failure to fit traditional ideals. But #MAGA, Fox News America is a place where all the classic signifiers of privilege and wealth work on overdrive: country-club-issue blue blazers with brass buttons and khaki pants, and above all else, for women, that yellow-blonde, carefully tended hair — a dog whistle of whiteness, an unspoken declaration of values, a wink-wink to the power of racial privilege and to the 1980s vibe that pervades a movement led by a man who still believes in the guilt of the Central Park Five.” [Emphasis added.]

Via Alex Griswold on Twitter.

Jack Shafer replied by pointing out that all networks like hiring newsreaders who don’t look like Ms. Larocca. (Although I have to object to the word “Aryan” below–blonde women are not responsible for Nazi racial theories.)

 

 

Another tweeter pointed out the most definitely peroxided blonde in American public life—the 69-year-old Hillary Clinton.

The young Hillary  of the 60s and 70s wasn’t that blonde according to contemporary photographs, but she must be dying her hair now. (Possibly to give totally false impression of youth and health.) By comparison, many of the blonde conservatives must be natural blondes.

But while many people are blogging about the blondeness as “a dog whistle of whiteness”, I’d like to talk about the Central Park Five—five blacks convicted (on their own confession) in the violent rape of Trisha Meili, who before she herself made her name public, was known as the Central Park Jogger. Trump does, apparently believe that they were guilty—see Years after the Central Park Five were exonerated, Trump still suggests they’re guilty Lisa Mascaro Los Angeles Times Oct 7, 2016.

So do I, so does Patrick Cleburne, so does Nicholas Stix, so does Peter Brimelow. In Trump Right About Central Park 5 – And Who Else Is Brave Enough To Say So? Patrick Cleburne wrote

I have a personal input into this controversy. Some years later, long after the shock had faded, I was at a private dinner in New York where Linda Fairstein was present. Fairstein ran the prosecution of this case. She was already launched in her novelist career. She remarked, without any particular prompting, that the doctors who dealt with the victim judged that she had been raped by at least 30 men. In telling us this, of course, Fairstein was admitting grievous failure as a prosecutor since only 5 were convicted.

After the fact, when DNA testing became more useful, a lowlife whose DNA was found in the woman was induced to take entire responsibility for the crime.

The “exoneration” was due to what I would call the “power of racial privilege”—black racial privilege.

See more on this below:

So here are some blondes who are examples of what Ms. Larocca considers “power of racial privilege”—the Central Park Jogger:

Alison Parker (right) an actual blonde newsreader,  shot by Vester Lee Flanagan(left) a black affirmative action hire who believed that she had made “racist comments”.

Anne Pressly, right, a blonde newsreader in Little Rock, murdered by Curtis Lavelle Vance, left.

I wouldn’t call what happened to any of these women the result of the “power of racial privilege”. Rather, it’s the result of a decades-long drumbeat of hate against “whiteness”–see “You Swine Happy Now? by Jared Taylor, American Renaissance, February 5, 2013.